Radial head and neck fractures in adults

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July 8, 2019
radial head and neck fractures in adults

В  radial head fractures occur throughout adulthood the mean age at the time of injury is approximately 45 years. Fractures of the radial neck occur most often in children and are much less common in adults. The radial head and neck comprise the most proximal portion of the radius (figure 1 and figure 2 and figure 3).

Nonarticular portion of the radial head is a 90 degree arc from radial styloid to listers tubercle (safe zone for hardware placement) radial head must be fixed or replaced to restore stability, preventing proximal migration of the radius and ulnocarpal impaction. May be difficult to determine on exam, can get dynamic ct scan in neutral.

Radial neck fractures are, together with the radial head fractures, relatively common injuries, especially in adults, although they can be occult on radiographs. Radial neck fractures are almost always the result of a fall onto an outstretched hand. Force applied along the radius results in impaction of the radial head against the capitellum.

Radial head and neck fractures in children are a relatively common traumatic injury that usually affects the radial neck (metaphysis) in children 9-10 years of age.

Radial head fractures are, together with the radial neck fractures, relatively common injuries, especially in adults, although they can be occult on radiographs. Although fractures of the radial head are seen in all age groups, they usually occur in adults (85 between 20-60 years of age) and more frequently in women (m f 12) 2.

Radial head fractures are common injuries, occurring in about 20 of all acute elbow injuries. Many elbow dislocations also involve fractures of the radial head. Radial head fractures are more frequent in women than in men, and are more likely to happen in people who are between 30 and 40 years of age.

В  background there have been no reports on the long-term outcome of radial neck mason type iiib fractures in adults. Methods 3 women and 2 men, aged 46 (2269) years when they sustained a radial neck mason type iiib fracture, were evaluated after an average of 18 (1621) years. Results 3 individuals had no subjective elbow complaints while 2.

The objective of this work is to describe the biomechanical role of the radial head, to discuss the role for radial head replacement in the treatment of radial head fractures in adults, and to assess the outcomes and main complications of this procedure in the light of recently published data.

In conclusion, ultrasound imaging proved to be an effective method for diagnosing occult fractures of the radial head or neck when initial radiograms showed only intraarticular effusion.